Introducing the latest product from Canonical (for those who aren’t familiar with it yet): Ubuntu for Android. With pairing of open-source systems on your phone, you will have two operating systems on one Android device with partitions and a bootloader as if it were a PC.

How does it work? Easy. When you have your phone in your pocket, you will have an Android operating system, but when you connect it to a TV or computer monitor using a special connector you can use Ubuntu in all of its glory, and even run Unity, the new user interface.

Both operating systems share the same kernel, which is why you’re not really running Ubuntu on Android or viceversa, but rather both systems are active at the same time on the same device. The result of this symbiotic relationship is an exceptionally efficient performance on both.

They also share all the same data and configuration settings between each other, allowing you to send a text message from the Ubuntu Messaging Menu, make a phone call directly from the desktop, or search in your contacts (in this case they’re called Ubuntu-Android unified contacts) in your Ubuntu address book. You can even run Android apps on your Ubuntu desktop from a special window.

When Mark Shuttleworth announced his goal for 200 million Ubuntu users by 2015, many scoffed at him, but only until he launched his multi-platform plan for Ubuntu. Now there are many countries where Android phone sales greatly exceed the sales of PCs. Logically, one must suppose that within months, once you can get your hands on the right plug to connect the phone to a screen, and the status of development is advanced enough, the PC market will take a hit.

It hasn’t been made clear yet which devices will be placed on the market with this feature already integrated, but a few weeks ago the first of its kind was unveiled. NexPhone is an independent project that, with a crowdfunding campaign, is planning on launching its Ubuntu-integrated device. “The Ubuntu desktop will be the top app for new Android phones with a quad-core processor,” according to Mark Shuttleworth. “Ubuntu for Android will transform your high-end phone into a very productive desktop, where and whenever you need it.” I’m already biting off my nails in anticipation.

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